Events

Bill Brown and Gabriel Moreno: Assemblage and the Factory

Red Carpet Service

Join Bill Brown and Gabriel Moreno in conversation as they focus on Moreno’s body of sculptural work as a starting point for discussing Assemblage, assembly, and the role of objects in reflecting upon individual and collective experience.

This event will take place in the Creative Wing on the 2nd Floor of the Art Center. 

Artist Bios: 

Bill Brown works at the intersection of literary, visual, and material cultures, with an emphasis on what he calls "object relations in an expanded field." He asks how inanimate objects enable human subjects (individually and collectively) to form and transform themselves: How do individuals try to stabilize the "significance" of their lives through the act of collecting? What role do objects play in the formation of gender, sexual, ethnic, and national subjectivity? How are subcultural formations mediated by objects? What kinds of fetishism have yet to be explained by the logic of either commodity fetishism or erotic fetishism? His approach to such questions makes use of psychoanalysis, materialist phenomenology, and the anthropological discourse on the "social life of things," and he’s tried, in a piece called "Thing Theory," to point out how things and thingness might become new objects of critical analysis.


Gabriel Moreno is an artist working across sculpture and installation. He looks to the intersection of materiality, people, and ideas to explore the pressures they exert on each other. His process is defined by a particular approach to production: recognizing as material changes, relations between an object and a person dynamically change. His current projects look to refrigerators as an entry point for investigating processes of material production and social assembly in tandem. Lifting, cutting, transferring, wrapping, and mending, he deploys a diverse range of craft methods. Proposing construction and de-construction are one-in-the-same, making is an integral method to mine thought where it becomes embedded in objects via industrial, quotidian, and consumer behaviors.